Feeding Indiana's Hungry

Indiana's State Association of Food Banks

Menu Close

Category: Hunger Action Month (page 1 of 2)

Survey Finds 20 Percent of Hoosier Households with Children Struggle to Afford Food

New Data Underscore Need to Protect and Improve Federal Nutrition Programs

One in 5 households with children in Indiana reported in surveys covering the 2014–2015 period that they struggled to afford enough food, according to a new report released today by the Food Research & Action Center (FRAC).

Food Hardship in America: Households with Children Especially Hard Hit provides data on food hardship — the inability to afford enough food — for the nation, every state, and 100 of the country’s largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs).

  • Indiana ranked 23 out of 49 states and the District of Columbia, with 19.8 percent of households with children in 2014-2015 reporting they were unable to afford enough food.
  • Louisville/Jefferson County (IN-KY) MSA ranked 11 out of 100 with a food hardship rate of 24.4 percent for households with children in 2014-2015.
  • Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson MSA ranked 46 out of 100 with a food hardship rate of 19.9 percent for households with children in 2014-2015.
  • Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI MSA ranked 63 out of 100 with a food hardship rate of 18.4 percent for households with children in 2014-2015.
  • Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN MSA ranked 90 out of 100 with a food hardship rate of 14.9percent for households with children in 2014-2015.

Nationally, the food hardship rate for households with children (19.2 percent) was substantially higher than the food hardship rate for households without children (14.2 percent).

“Too many children across our state, and the nation, are missing out on the nutrition they need for their healthy growth and development,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry. “This is unacceptable when there are solutions to end hunger now.”

Research shows that participation in federal nutrition programs, such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and meals provided during child care, school, afterschool, and summer, mitigate hunger and supports children’s health and learning.

“We urge Congress to do right by their constituents and protect and strengthen federal nutrition programs,” added Bryant. “With political will, we can ensure all children have the nutrition they need for their health and learning.”

Food Hardship in America: Households with Children Especially Hard Hit contains data throughout 2014 and 2015 for 49 states and 100 of the country’s largest metropolitan areas (MSAs). The data were gathered as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index survey, which has been interviewing hundreds of households annually since January 2008. FRAC has analyzed responses to the question: “Have there been times in the past 12 months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your family needed?” A “yes” answer to this question is considered to signal that the household experienced food hardship.

The full report is available at www.frac.org

Editor’s Note: Maine rates were excluded from this report due to anomalies in the Gallup polling data in that state.

The Food Research & Action Center (FRAC) is the leading national nonprofit organization working to improve public policies and public-private partnerships to eradicate hunger and undernutrition in the United States. In its A Plan of Action to End Hunger in America, FRAC recommends a policy path for the nation to reduce the suffering and unnecessary costs caused by struggles with hunger, poverty, and reduced opportunity. Follow FRAC on Facebook and Twitter.

Food Insecurity Rises Slightly in Indiana, While Declining Nationally

1 in 7 Hoosier Households Struggled with Hunger in 2014

Household Food Security research released today by the USDA Economic Research Service illustrates no significant improvement in reducing food insecurity in Indiana. One in seven Hoosier households struggled with hunger on average in the years 2012-2014.

Corporate Photo Female client selects takes grains rolls Ramen bread Weight Watchers out of a box outside outdoor pantry many clients

The report found that 14.6 percent of Hoosiers now live in food insecure households, up from 14.1 percent in 2013. The national household food insecurity rate declined from 14.3 percent in 2013 to 14.0 percent in 2014.

“While the needle seems to be fluctuating, no real improvement is being made to ensure that Hoosier families have enough food to remain healthy and active,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.

Across the nation, households outside metropolitan areas (more rural areas) are seeing considerably deeper struggles with hunger compared to those inside metropolitan areas, with higher rates of food insecurity (17.1 percent compared to 13.5 percent), higher rates of food insecurity in households with children (23.6 percent compared to 18.4 percent), and higher rates of very low food security (7.3 percent compared to 5.3 percent).

The report also captured rates of very low food security, when households reported disrupted eating patterns or hunger due to inadequate resources for food on multiple occasions during the year. It found that 6.4 percent of Hoosiers lived in households with very low food security last year, above the national average of 5.6 percent.

“More than 1 million Hoosiers rely on our emergency food network, which continues to set new records in food distribution, but this will not solve the problem,” said Bryant. “Our nation can solve hunger. The federal nutrition programs are among the most effective tools in ensuring people of all ages get the food they need to be active and healthy.  We’re urging our elected leaders to keep these programs strong, and that starts with a strong Child Nutrition Reauthorization bill this fall.”

Hunger Action Day in Indiana: Wear Orange to Fight Hunger

Public News Service – IN | September 2015 | Download audio

Every dollar donated buys nine meals at the Food Bank of Northern Indiana. Courtesy: Food Bank of Northern IndianaImagine not knowing where your next meal will come from.

Getting enough food to eat is a daily battle for one in six Hoosiers, including more than 340,000 children.

Today is Hunger Action Day, and hunger-relief groups in Indiana are shining a light on the problem of food insecurity.

Many people who turn to food banks have a job, but still can’t afford basic necessities, explains Marijo Martinec, associate director of the Food Bank of Northern Indiana. And, she says, that leads to difficult decisions.

“Whether to buy food or pay utilities, rent, medications,” she explains. “We’ve also seen people that maybe donated in the past to our food bank but now have to come to our agencies to receive services.”

During September, people are encouraged to donate, volunteer, advocate and educate others on the realities of hunger today.

Martinec says people can start by wearing orange today as a symbolic color of hunger.

Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry, says there are ways to pitch in at food banks and pantries around the state all year long. She says, typically, they have very few staff and always need volunteers to sort food, or pack senior boxes and food backpacks for children.

“Going into the holidays there’s a lot of opportunities for volunteering and for participating and for donations,” she points out. “But folks are hungry year-round and the food banks are doing their jobs year-round, so bringing a little bit more awareness carries out that mission throughout the whole year.”

Weikert Bryant adds that those who want to help but are short on time, can give money. She suggests perhaps skipping a daily specialty coffee and instead donating to a food pantry.

At the Food Bank of Northern Indiana, nine meals can be purchased for every dollar donated.

Feeding Indiana’s Hungry & Feeding America Network Raise Awareness of the Issue of Hunger Throughout Hunger Action Month

Hunger-Relief Organizations Encourage the Public to Join Spoontember this September and Support the 49 Million People Who Struggle with Hunger in America

Feeding Indiana’s Hungry, a Partner State Association of  the Feeding America® nationwide network of food banks, will observe Hunger Action MonthTM – a nationwide initiative designed to mobilize the Orange-Spoon-(35x162px)public to take action on the issue of hunger and join the movement to help end hunger. Hunger advocates from Indiana and across the country are working together this September to shine a light on the issue of hunger and the 1 in 6 people who face hunger in America – including more than one million Hoosiers.

“One in six people, including nearly 348,600 children in Indiana struggle with hunger, and Feeding Indiana’s Hungry is eager to rally around Hunger Action Month as we continue our fight to solve this issue,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of the state association of food banks. “Hunger is an issue that affects everyone – our child’s classmate, an office coworker or neighbor down the street. September is an opportunity for all hunger-relief advocates to take simple steps towards supporting those in need.”

The Feeding America network of food banks also is participating in the new SpoontemberTM online initiative. To get involved, supporters can share a ‘spoon selfie’ or video of themselves balancing a spoon on their nose – a utensil that is most often used to prepare and provide food for others – and challenge friends and family to join them to generate awareness of the 49 million Americans who may not know where they’ll find their next meal.

In addition, many food banks will commemorate Hunger Action Day®, which will be held Thursday, September 3.  Hunger Action Day is an opportunity for the country to learn more about how hunger affects their community. Click here to find Hunger Action Day and Hunger Action Month events at regional food banks.

“Domestic hunger affects every community in our nation, preventing millions of families, seniors and children from thriving,” said Matt Knott, president of Feeding America. “This September we all are given a chance to come together and make a difference for those facing hunger.”

Individuals can also help show their support for hunger relief and Spoontember by joining the Hunger Action Month Thunderclap on Hunger Action Day, Thursday September 3, at 12pm EST. By visiting the Hunger Action Month Thunderclap page, advocates can synchronize a Thunderclap Facebook and Twitter message to be shared in tandem with thousands of others to raise awareness about domestic hunger.

Feeding Indiana’s Hungry Marks Hunger Action Month, Becoming a Feeding America Partner State Association

Indianapolis, Indiana: Kicking off PSA logoHunger Action Month, Feeding Indiana’s Hungry (FIsH) announces its official partnership with Feeding America, the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization, by becoming a Partner State Association (PSA).

“As we join our fellow Feeding America partners in Hunger Action Month activities across the nation, we are honored to be recognized as a Feeding America Partner State Association,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry. “There is no better time than September to bring attention to our member food banks and all that they do to support Hoosiers struggling to put enough food on their tables. Joining Feeding America as a Partner State Association will better enable us to support our members and the Hoosiers they serve, and builds on a productive long-standing relationship Feeding Indiana’s Hungry has had with Feeding America for many years.”September is Hunger Action Month across the nation, an opportunity for Indiana organizations, businesses, and individuals to join a movement that has a real and lasting impact on our effort to feed more Hoosiers than ever before. Whether it’s by advocating and raising awareness, making donations, or volunteering, everyone can find the way that’s right for them to make a difference during Hunger Action Month.All eleven member food banks of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry are members of Feeding America:
Food Bank of Northwest Indiana, Gary
Food Bank of Northern Indiana, South Bend
Food Finders Food Bank, Inc., Lafayette
Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Ft. Wayne
Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana, Inc., Muncie
Gleaners Food Bank of Indiana, Indianapolis
Terre Haute Catholic Charities Foodbank, Terre Haute
Hoosier Hills Food Bank, Bloomington
Tri-State Food Bank, Inc., Evansville
Dare to Care Food Bank, Louisville, KY
Freestore Foodbank, Cincinnati, OH

Collectively, these 11 member food banks serve all 92 counties in Indiana. These member food banks solicited, warehoused, transported and distributed more than 80 million pounds of food last year through more than 1,700 local pantries, soup kitchens, after school programs, and other food assistance programs.

Established in 2005, Feeding Indiana’s Hungry was created to maximize public-private partnerships that link hunger service providers, retailers, food producers, and processors from around the state. The partnerships enable food and funding resources to be more effectively identified and coordinated to better serve Hoosiers in need. Over nearly ten years, partnerships have broadened to encompass Hoosier agriculture, including the Indiana Pork Producers and the Indiana Soybean Alliance through the “Million Meals” pork purchase and distribution program; the American Dairy Association of Indiana; Indiana’s Family of Farmers; Indiana Dairy Producers; the Indiana Vegetable Growers’ Association; and other commodity groups. Feeding Indiana’s Hungry works with Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller and the Indiana State Bar Association on the March Against Hunger food drive.

Other partners include Indiana’s Family & Social Services Administration through SNAP outreach; the Indiana State Department of Health for food safety awareness; and Indiana’s Department of Natural Resources and hunting organizations to facilitate the processing of deer donated by hunters for distribution at the food banks.  The organization works with generous corporate partners in the food industry. Feeding Indiana’s Hungry additionally works with the Indiana Coalition for Human Services and other partners serving similar populations, and serve as a member of Indiana Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (INVOAD).  For more information about hunger in Indiana and how you can help, visit http://feedingindianashungry.org. Find us on Facebook at facebook.com/FeedingIndianasHungry or follow us on Twitter attwitter.com/FeedINsHungry.

About Feeding America

Feeding America is a nationwide network of 200 food banks that leads the fight against hunger in the United States. Together, we provide food to more than 37 million people through 61,000 food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters in communities across America. Feeding America also supports programs that improve food security among the people we serve; educates the public about the problem of hunger; and advocates for legislation that protects people from going hungry. Individuals, charities, businesses and government all have a role in ending hunger. Donate. Volunteer. Advocate. Educate.  Together we can solve hunger. Visit http://www.feedingamerica.org/. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/FeedingAmerica or follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/FeedingAmerica.

One in Four Households with Children in IN Report Inability to Afford Enough Food

Data Also Show Widespread Struggle in Every State and Metropolitan Area, Underscoring Need to Protect Nutrition Safety Net

Indianap101115-FA-FL-200 (2)olis, IN– September 18, 2013 – The recession has meant that high numbers of all types of households have been struggling to purchase adequate food, but households with children suffered extraordinarily high rates, according to a new national report released today. In surveys running for five years through 2012, nearly one in four households with children said they couldn’t consistently afford food, even as the House Majority Leadership is proposing to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) by a staggering $40 billion.

Food Hardship 2008-2012: Geography and Household Structure, released by the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), found that in surveys from 2008-2012, 26.5 percent of households with children in Indiana said there were times in the prior year when they did not have enough money to buy food that they needed for themselves or their family.  17 percent of households without children Indiana said they faced the same struggle.  Indiana is ranked 16th worst in the nation in both categories.

“Given the economic struggles that continue to persist in Indiana, we urge our Hoosier delegation in Congress to reject cuts to SNAP,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.   “Food hardship is far too high for all households in Indiana, and the situation for households with children is far worse. Our Members of Congress need to act on what’s going to help, not hurt struggling families here, and the first step is to pass a Farm Bill that doesn’t cut SNAP.”

This report is consistent with data released by the federal government this month which show how many Americans continue to struggle. Food insecurity data, released by the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), show that 13.5 of households in Indiana struggled with hunger during the 2010 to 2012 period. (Those data are not broken down by households with and without children.) And poverty data released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau showed Indiana’s incomes trailed the U.S. average in 2012 by 9 percent, the 12th year in a row Hoosiers’ earnings have lagged behind the average Americans’.

“What these data tell us is that there’s a new reality for too many Hoosiers. Hunger and poverty rates spiked at the beginning of the recession and have stayed high ever since,” said Bryant.  “And the food hardship data reveal the extraordinary frequency of that struggle for households with children who say they can’t afford enough food. Cutting SNAP would worsen an already terrible situation.”

The FRAC analysis examines food hardship rates – the inability to afford enough food – for households with and without children. Data are available for the nation, every state and region, and 100 of the country’s largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), including Indianapolis-Carmel, and the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Chicago MSAs which contain portions of Indiana. Findings for childhood food hardship for surveys from 2008-2012 in these MSAs include:

  • For the Indianapolis-Carmel MSA, the food hardship rate for households with children was 22.4 percent for households with children (54th in the nation), and 17.1 percent for households without children (20th in the nation).
  • For the Louisville MSA, the food hardship rate for households with children was 28 percent for households with children (10th in the nation), and 16.5 percent for households without children (30th in the nation).
  • For the Cincinnati MSA, the food hardship rate for households with children was 22 percent for households with children (57th in the nation), and 15.8 percent for households without children (38th in the nation).
  • For the Chicago MSA, the food hardship rate for households with children was 21.8 percent for households with children (60th in the nation), and 13.6 percent for households without children (68th in the nation).

The full analysis is available on FRAC’s website (www.frac.org).

About the data

FRAC’s Food Hardship in America series analyzes data that were collected by Gallup and provided to FRAC. The data were gathered as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project, which has interviewed nearly 1.8 million households between 2008 and 2012. FRAC has analyzed responses to the question: “Have there been times in the past twelve months when you did not have enough money to buy food that you or your family needed?”

 

September is Hunger Action Month

More than 50 million people in the US face hunger;
wear orange to show your support on Sept.5

Hunger advocates from Indiana and across the country will be wearing orange on Sept. 5 in an effort to raise awareness of the more than 50 million people in the US who face hunger. It’s just one of the many awareness events taking place throughout the month of September in recognitiHAM_Logo_Specson of Feeding America’s Hunger Action Month – a month-long campaign to help end hunger in our country.

Staring Sept. 1, the regional food banks of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry and other food banks in the Feeding America network, will kick off Hunger Action Month by holding events throughout the country to inspire people to take action to help the millions of people who are food insecure in the United States.

Indiana events include galas, Civic Food Fights, hunger roundtable discussions, motorcycle rides, zombie walks, food drives, and volunteer opportunities at every food bank in our network. Thousands of volunteers are expected to participate in food bank activities throughout the US.

“Every day in Indiana, many Hoosiers struggle to put food on the table,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.  “Hunger Action Month calls us to do something about it. Whether it’s something easy like wearing orange or changing a Facebook profile, something hands on like volunteering at a food bank or pantry, or something difficult and moving like a SNAP challenge, we ask every Hoosier to stop and think at least once this month about the one in six Hoosiers, and one in four Hoosier children, who don’t know how they’ll get their next meal.”

Here in Indiana, about 16 percent of the population struggles with hunger, including 355,780 children. Overall, more than one million Hoosiers lack access at times to enough food for an active and healthy lifestyle.

“It’s a shame that in the ‘land of plenty’ we have neighbors and friends who have to worry about where they will get their next meal,” said Bob Aiken, CEO of Feeding America. “By raising awareness and working together, we can solve hunger.”

Events taking place across the country include:

  • Hunger Action Day – wear orange to support hunger awareness (Sept. 5)
  • Light up for hunger. Buildings around the country will be lighting up orange throughout the month to show their support, including Houston’s City Hall, Chase Tower in Phoenix, and Sundance Square in Ft. Worth, TX.
  • Jeff Gordon’s race car will display a “Hunger Action Month” sticker on it during a nationally broadcast (ABC-TV) race at the Richmond International Raceway, thanks to a partnership with AARP Foundation. (Sept. 7)

To learn more about Hunger Action Month and events in your area, please visit www.hungeractionmonth.org.

USDA Report Shows That Food Insecurity Remains High; More Than 50 Million Americans Face the Reality of Hunger

In Indiana, 331,980 households are at risk of going hungry

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported yesterday that 13.2 percent of Hoosier households are food insecure. Overall, that’s 331,980 households in the state who are at risk of hunger.  Indiana saw an increase of 2 percent in household food insecurity rates from the prior three-year period, 2006-2008 to 2009-2011.  “Food insecurity” means one or more people in the household were hungry over the course of the year because of the inability to afford enough food.

“Families, children, seniors, and many working Hoosiers are struggling to put enough food on their tables in our state,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, Executive Director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.  “Our member food banks are distributing food at record-breaking rates doing their best to keep up.  While the economy continues to recover, it is vital that federal food programs are maintained and that Hoosiers keep working together to help their friends and neighbors.  No one should go hungry in Indiana, period.”

Nationally, there are over 50 million Americans facing hunger in the US, with nearly 17 million being children. That means 1 in 6 Americans lives in a household that worry about where they will get their next meal.

The report, which highlights food insecurity at national and state levels, shows that the number of households struggling with food insecurity remains well above pre-recession totals. In 2007, the number of food insecure individuals was 36 million. The following year that number skyrocketed to 50 million, and has remained at or near that level for the past four years.

Feeding Indiana’s Hungry Announces 2011 Hoosier Hunger Heroes
Hunger Hero award publicly recognizes partners for their role in alleviating hunger in Indiana

INDIANAPOLIS, IN  (September 22, 2011)  Feeding Indiana’s Hungry, the statewide association of Indiana’s Feeding America affiliated food banks, is pleased to announce the recipients of its third annual Hoosier Hunger Hero award, an award created to honor and recognize individuals and partners who make a compassionate and transformational impact on those who are hungry in Indiana.

Last year, one in six Hoosiers was at risk of not having enough to eat, and the rate for Hoosier children was as high as one in four.  The member food banks of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry distributed nearly 60 million pounds of food in 2010 through 1,700 partner agencies like pantries, soup kitchens, after school programs, and congregate meal sites. 

Feeding Indiana’s Hungry today honored Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller.  For the third consecutive year, Zoeller partnered with the Indiana State Bar Association and Feeding Indiana’s Hungry to call on law firms and lawyers to raise money and food donations benefiting 11 regional food banks. The 2011 March Against Hunger raised more than 6,000 pounds of food and $27,574, which combined is the equivalent of 143,986 pounds (or 72 tons) of assistance.

“All members of the legal profession take an oath to serve the interests of their clients above their own,” Zoeller said. “It has been heartwarming to see the response of attorneys in Indiana step up to help the food banks in our state serve those who struggle to feed their families. As Attorney General I’m honored to accept this recognition on behalf of all attorneys who have helped fulfill our oath.”


Feeding Indiana’s Hungry also honored Bob Forney.  Mr. Forney was a Hoosier and the Founding President and CEO of The Global FoodBanking Network (GFN), an international organization that works collaboratively to reduce world hunger by securing more food and enhancing the ability to efficiently distribute food through food banks and food bank networks around the globe.  Mr. Forney served as President and CEO of Feeding America, the largest U.S. charitable domestic hunger relief organization. Previously, Mr. Forney was President and CEO of the Chicago Stock Exchange Inc.  Mr. Forney passed away unexpectedly last August.
“The Hunger Heroes we are honoring represent the finest examples of Hunger Relief Advocates there are,” said Jane Avery, president of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry and executive director of Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana. “Bob Forney spent his life helping feed people on the national level and Attorney General Greg Zoeller has used his statewide influence to feed hungry Hoosiers. These fine individuals deserve our respect and appreciation for their immense contributions to hunger relief,” said Avery.

USDA Report Shows That 13 Percent of Hoosier Households are Food Insecure in a Three Year Average; 49 Million Americans Overall

Hoosier Numbers Growing and Could Continue to Do So, Given Economic Outlook and Proposed Budget Cuts
September 9, 2011—The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported this week that 13 percent of Hoosier households are food insecure, according to a three year average.  Overall, 1 in 6 Americans lives in a household that is food insecure.  This new data comes during Indiana’s Hunger Action Week, as declared by Governor Mitch Daniels, and just days after Feeding Indiana’s Hungry and Feeding America, the nation’s largest domestic hunger relief organization, released a new study which revealed that 24.5 percent of children under the age of 18 in Indiana are struggling with hunger.

Food insecurity is defined by the USDA as the limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or the ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways.  

“These new numbers show that food insecurity has continued to rise in Indiana roughly a percent a year over the last three years, while nationally, numbers remained steady or improved this year,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, Executive Director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.  “Combined with recent reports from Feeding America and other anti-hunger advocates, a clear picture is painted to show that hunger does exist in Indiana and it will not go away on its own. We must address this critical need head-on to ensure that our citizens are getting the help necessary to succeed in school and in the workplace, and that our seniors do not go without.”
Nationally, among the nearly 49 million Americans facing hunger in the US, more than 16 million are children.  Five million households experiencing food insecurity include at least one senior.   The USDA collected the data in December, 2010.
“Many Hoosiers who are food insecure are also experiencing unemployment or underemployment, which remains at historically high levels,” said Bryant.  “As Congress and the Administration look for ways to reduce the federal deficit, it is more critical than ever to protect nutrition programs that provide the first line of defense against hunger in America.”
The USDA released a study  earlier this year, which found that provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) helped reduce food insecurity among people receiving benefits through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program, when compared to low-income households that are not eligible for SNAP benefits.
SNAP is the nation’s largest nutrition program, now serving more than 45 million low-income people nationally and 884,000 Hoosiers.  Seventy nine percent of the households receiving SNAP nationally include a child, elderly, or disabled person.
The Senate is currently considering legislation funding several critical nutrition programs for FY2012. The House has already approved legislation that would significantly weaken the nutrition safety net.
Last spring, Feeding America conducted a research study to reveal food insecurity rates at the county level. Map the Meal Gap showed that hunger exists in every county in Indiana, ranging from 10 percent in Hamilton County, to 22 percent in Fayette County.

“The pervasiveness of hunger requires a strong partnership between federal nutrition programs and the charitable distribution system to feed people in need, and our member food banks are up to the challenge,” said Bryant. “ While our nation faces many serious challenges today, the costs of children growing up hungry and seniors spending a lifetime working hard and retiring hungry are great.  Hunger is simply one battle we cannot afford to lose.”